recycledmoviecostumes:

Hollywood starlet Marilyn Monroe is still a household name more than fifty years after her death. Her films are still loved by millions, and a couple of the many iconic costumes that she wore over the years have sold for seven figure sums.  
The majority of Marilyn’s gowns were designed by William Travilla, and while we associate them with Marilyn and the roles she played, it is easy to forget that her wardrobe was the property of 20th Century Fox, the studio to which she was under contract.  Most of her costumes eventually found a second life on other actresses, either in film or in promotional images for the studio.
This orange gown, accented with sequins and beads appeared on Marilyn in the 1953 film Gentleman Prefer Blondes, where she played the character of Lorelei Lee.  Several years later in 1956, the dress was used again on Abbey Lincoln playing herself in The Girl Can’t Help It, where she performed a number entitled “Spread the Word”, which can be seen here.
Costume Credit: Lelia
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
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recycledmoviecostumes:

Hollywood starlet Marilyn Monroe is still a household name more than fifty years after her death. Her films are still loved by millions, and a couple of the many iconic costumes that she wore over the years have sold for seven figure sums.  
The majority of Marilyn’s gowns were designed by William Travilla, and while we associate them with Marilyn and the roles she played, it is easy to forget that her wardrobe was the property of 20th Century Fox, the studio to which she was under contract.  Most of her costumes eventually found a second life on other actresses, either in film or in promotional images for the studio.
This orange gown, accented with sequins and beads appeared on Marilyn in the 1953 film Gentleman Prefer Blondes, where she played the character of Lorelei Lee.  Several years later in 1956, the dress was used again on Abbey Lincoln playing herself in The Girl Can’t Help It, where she performed a number entitled “Spread the Word”, which can be seen here.
Costume Credit: Lelia
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
Zoom Info

recycledmoviecostumes:

Hollywood starlet Marilyn Monroe is still a household name more than fifty years after her death. Her films are still loved by millions, and a couple of the many iconic costumes that she wore over the years have sold for seven figure sums. 

The majority of Marilyn’s gowns were designed by William Travilla, and while we associate them with Marilyn and the roles she played, it is easy to forget that her wardrobe was the property of 20th Century Fox, the studio to which she was under contract.  Most of her costumes eventually found a second life on other actresses, either in film or in promotional images for the studio.

This orange gown, accented with sequins and beads appeared on Marilyn in the 1953 film Gentleman Prefer Blondes, where she played the character of Lorelei Lee.  Several years later in 1956, the dress was used again on Abbey Lincoln playing herself in The Girl Can’t Help It, where she performed a number entitled “Spread the Word”, which can be seen here.

Costume Credit: Lelia

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



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todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



Too good not to share
Zoom Info
todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



Too good not to share
Zoom Info
todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



Too good not to share
Zoom Info
todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



Too good not to share
Zoom Info
todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago
George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).
Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  
(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)



Too good not to share
Zoom Info

todaysdocument:

Babe Ruth’s Major League Baseball Debut, 100 Years Ago

George Herman “Babe” Ruth made his major league debut with the Boston Red Sox one hundred years ago on July 11, 1914.  Originally signed as a pitcher, Ruth quickly established a reputation for hitting, breaking the single season home run record by 1919.  Ruth played with the Red Sox for 5 years until his contract was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919 (and triggering the now-reversed “Curse of the Bambino” and denying Boston another World Series title for 86 years).

Ruth is seen in this unidentified newsreel excerpt, circa 1919. Based on the clues in the title frame, our best guess is this was the September 8, 1919 Red Sox-Yankees game at the New York Polo Grounds, when Ruth hit his 26th home run of the season.  

(This footage is part of a documentary film collection donated to the National Archives by CBS in 1967)

Too good not to share